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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

Cheap and Cheerful

George Orwell thought that paperbacks were a good idea, particularly for the reader. But he also thought publishers and booksellers should combine to suppress them.
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Trollope and Ireland: A Talk

John McCourt, Joycean scholar and chronicler of the Trieste years, will be talking about Anthony Trollope's Irish novels in Books Upstairs, D'Olier Street on Sunday, April 19th.
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Eduardo Galeano: 1940-2015

The Uruguayan writer, journalist and political essayist, who had died aged 74, was an inspirational figure for generations of the Latin American left.
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Günter Grass: 1927-2015

The Nobel prizewinner was the best-known German writer internationally and a major figure in both literature and political controversy over half a century.
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All the same we're different

A minister recently suggested that Polish immigrants might be losing out on the possibility of social integration by attending their own schools on Saturdays. But surely if they don't they will be losing out too.
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Remembering George Byrne

Journalist, film critic, pundit and ferocious conversationalist George Byrne died last week. John Fleming remembers the early years.
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The Dublin Library Society

A nineteenth century Dublin institution, first located in Eustace Street and then in D'Olier Street, afforded its members access to newspapers, pamphlets and serious literature, all for the price of one guinea a year.
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Liffey Street Angelus

A poem by Keith Payne from his latest collection
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Recession and Suicide

The causes of a spike in suicides and self-harm have been traced to financial insecurity and other effects of the recession, yet the response is to treat it as a result of staffing problems in the health service.
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Wiping the slate

The desire to obliterate the useless past can be found in various forms, from smashing 'superstitious' statues and images to wishing to ban 'fairy tales' from the classroom.
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Money, managerialism and the university

Prof Thomas Docherty, a leading critic of the managerialist threat to the traditional idea and role of the university, is to give a talk at Maynooth University on March 25th.
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Irish Times Poetry Now award

Theo Dorgan has been awarded the Irish Times Poetry Now award for his most recent collection, 'Nine Bright Shiners'.
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Prizes at Leipzig

Germany's second biggest book fair, at Leipzig, is oriented towards the reading public rather than the trade. Over the last week it attracted 186,000 visitors, a record.
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Write Badly And Influence People

What is the purpose of 'jargon'? Is it simply to bamboozle us and disguise the nature, or absence, of the message? Or do difficult concepts sometimes need difficult words? A bit of both perhaps.
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Man can't spell diarrhoea ...

In the editing game there's no reason why you shouldn't get everything in your text just so - as long as you've got unlimited time and an endless supply of well-trained staff. But in the real world nine out of ten sometimes ain't bad.
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In a Spanish bookshop

It is surprising perhaps to stumble across a small independent bookshop in a side street, and it can be even more surprising what you will find in it.
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Coláiste na Tríonóide and the new state

In the atmosphere of bitterness and political contention which followed the setting up of the new Irish state in the 1920s, Trinity College Dublin wished to be allowed to stand somewhat apart from the rest of society as a unionist bastion. It was not to prevail.
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A little of what you fancy

Can the observant Muslim take alcohol? The most common answer would be no, yet the ninth century Abassid caliphs so much admired by ISIS couldn't leave the stuff alone.
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Llareggub, trig and trim

Happy St David's Day, and if you're expecting to let the sun in, see it wipes its feet first.
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Learning the ropes at The Good Companions

England in the late 1960s was full of temptations, what with barmaids, divorcees and lingerie ads in the London Underground. It was the kind of place where anything might happen, though it didn't.
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