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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

    Found Again

    Enda Coyle-Greene
    Towards the close of Gerard Smyth’s quietly impressive collection, a sequence of elegies acts as both an act of creative solidarity and a defiant rebuttal of creativity’s all-too-inevitable cessation. The poems, rather like memory itself, call out to and answer each other.
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    The Joys of Fieldwork

    Ailbhe Nic Giolla Chomhaill
    The eloquence and elegance which often emerge from folklore archives is a thread which connects each of the essays in a new collection in honour of Ríonach uí Ógáin. Each of the authors gives his/her own insight into the ‘doing’ of fieldwork, which can be both a vocation and an addiction.
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    Time Fallen Away

    Marie Rooney
    Hilary Fannin’s beautifully written debut novel follows the lives of Ruth and Robin from London in 1995 to Dublin in 2018. An air of sadness pervades the novel – perhaps a sense of wasted time, of lack of fulfilment. In the end their relationship comes full circle. Or does it?
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    Remembering Lyra

    Dawn Miranda Sherratt-Bado

    ‘We were the Good Friday Agreement generation,’ wrote the journalist Lyra McKee, shot dead by the New IRA while working  in Derry a year ago, ‘destined to never witness the horrors of war but to reap the spoils of peace. The spoils just never seemed to reach us.’


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    Ourselves Alone

    Frank Callanan
    Ourselves Alone
    As the scale of Labour’s defeat became clear, a succession of Corbynists emerged to insist that the voters’ rejection of their policies was not a rejection at all and that nothing need change: a strange product of a new ‘leftism’ that exists not to seek power but largely for its own sake.
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    Ins and Outs

    Martin Tyrrell
    Ins and Outs
    Psychologist Henri Tajfel was an argumentative man and he encouraged similar aggressive attitudes in his colleagues and students. He tended to make up his mind early, a colleague wrote, if you were on the side of the angels or not. And he never changed his mind.
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    The Poet and the City

    Kathleen Shields
    The Poet and the City
    Austin Clarke, who started his writing career during the Celtic twilight years and adapted some Irish language poetic forms and themes, has suffered from falling on the wrong side of the nationalist/modernist divide, a contrast partially built on critical essays by Beckett.
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    For the Cause

    John Mulqueen
    In the mid-1930s, 40,000 men enlisted in the International Brigades to fight fascism in Spain. Many died, while the recollections of some who returned, like those published in a moving memoir from the mid-1970s, do not cast much credit on the organisers of the resistance.
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    There Will Be Order

    Alena Dvořáková
    László Krasznahorkai’s new novel, ‘Baron Wenckheim’s Homecoming’, reveals the kind of dynamic, both economic and emotional-spiritual, that has facilitated Viktor Orbán’s Hungarian ‘koronadiktatúra’, a form of rule which also appeals to other central European would-be autocrats.
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    Grá Don Domhain

    Alan Titley
    Cathal Ó Searcaigh’s love poems are part of a bigger picture in which quite simply love of life is the driving force. This love of life can be furled down to love of place, and love of nature, and love of language, more simply, love of the world.
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