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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

    Earth’s Old Bones

    Brendan Lowe
    Earth’s Old Bones
    John Keats championed the truth of imagination, while the naturalist Alexander Von Humboldt was the first to see nature as a unified organism. Moya Cannon invites both to tea. It’s an edgy business. She serves them in separate rooms and spends more time with Keats.
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    Down the Rabbit Hole

    Alex Bramwell
    A new collection of two works by the Russian-Irish novelist, poet and translator Anatoly Kudryavitsky features a writer who explores contemporary political themes but whose practice is grounded in the magical realist tradition which produced Mikhail Bulgakov.
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    A Cooling Cinder

    Pauline Hall
    A fictional portrait of Dublin in the years leading up to the Great War and 1916 is brimming with ideas and has a great deal of historical interest, even if its author’s ill-digested anger at his enemies and overschematic approach to characterisation may reduce the artistry.
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    The Vault of Feeling

    Shane Barry
    Kevin Stevens’s assured new novel explores the difficulties faced by a young immigrant of Arab and Muslim background in small-town America, difficulties which include racism and the weight of overbearing tradition, but which can be countered by friendship, love and art.
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    Boomtime Rot

    Aiden O’Reilly
    Dermot Bolger knows his characters, knows the schools they went to in the 1970s, the kind of parents they had, the parents’ world of the 1940s. But he also knows their teenage children born in the 90s, the slang they use and the changed dynamic of romantic relationships.
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    A Different Kind of Nothing

    Siobhán Parkinson
    A Different Kind of Nothing
    Paul Murray’s new novel is fiendishly clever, loosely yet convincingly plotted, as brash and vulgar at times as the world it portrays. It is wild, playful, baggy, perverse, exaggerated, carnivalesque; but it is endlessly engaging, riotously funny and devastatingly serious.
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    Hiss! Boo! Take it off!

    Adrian Hardiman
    The noisy censure of a dramatic performance must, in legal principle, be the expression of the feelings of the moment. If it is premeditated ‘by a number of persons confederated beforehand’ it becomes criminal. Such was the background to the ‘Playboy’ riots of 1907.
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    No Homes To Go To

    Luke Gibbons
    No Homes To Go To
    Dorothy Macardle was a friend of de Valera, an historian of the idea of the Irish Republic and a novelist. Her story ‘The Uninvited’, memorably filmed in 1944 with Ray Milland, is a haunted house tale set in Cornwall but with Irish undertones. It is reprinted this month.
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    Faith of our Filí

    Pól Ó Muirí
    John F Deane has written an honest book and filled it with some beautiful poetry. His life and times in Achill and beyond are described in the sort of prose that reminds you, and even jaundiced Irish-speaking reviewers too, why people like the English language
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    Some Northern Poets

    Gerald Dawe
    The lives of the Catholic nationalist community in the North, but also its wider migrations and fate in the fledgling new Irish Free State and in Britain, North America and further afield is a fascinating history of adaptation and adoption as much as restlessness and disaffection.
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