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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

Foreplay

Handsome men are a dime a dozen, believe me. And what are they going to do? Sit on you, that's what they'll do. But Raymond Chandler, oh Raymond, Raymond. There was a guy who knew how to treat furniture.
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Blessing of the Animals, 1787

Goethe, visiting Rome, stumbled upon Neddy, Bluebell and Dobbin receiving the blessings of the Lord. It made his day.
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Morrissey wins TS Eliot prize

Co Armagh-born Sinead Morrissey is the winner of the prestigious British poetry prize, following in the footsteps of Heaney, Muldoon, Carson and Longley.
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Words from the Departed

Some notable writers left us in the course of 2013. The Guardian remembers some of them through quotations from their remarks about their work or writing, or politics.
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Get thee behind me

For centuries he had found work for idle hands, and his picture book was becoming increasingly popular. Then, at the end of the seventeenth century, some people started saying he didn't exist.
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Cuisine versus Cucina

The French can be very high and mighty about their slow-cooked tripe in the manner of Caen, but there's more to Italian cooking than red sauce, Elizabeth David insisted.
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A Gulf not a Channel

The English do not understand the French, or at any rate didn't until the master thinkers of structuralism and poststructuralism began to invade their universities.
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Sterne at 300

The publication of Tristram Shandy, an anti-novel that became a model for many more, transformed him from an obscure country clergyman into the toast of London.
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It's polyphony, but with a murder

Tipperary writer Donal Ryan's novel is one of four which, together with one non-fiction title, have been nominated for the Guardian First Book award.
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An Unoffending Refusal

A refusal can often offend, but this is less likely to be the case when it's written in verse and composed by Margaret Atwood.
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Camus and Algeria

Albert Camus was born a hundred years ago this week. Towards the end of his short life he parted company from most French opinion on both left and right over the future of Algeria.
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Monster from the South Seas

Not everyone is impressed by the gargantuan Booker Prize winner.
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Kaiserlich und Königlich

The old Austro-Hungarian empire collapsed into its component parts after the First World War, a victim of rising nationalism and Woodrow Wilson's backing for national self-determination. Given the wave of fascism and authoritarianism that followed, leading to another war, many people thought something very valuable had been lost.
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Letter from New England

A new play performed by the American Repertory Theater in Cambridge, Massachusetts, features a superb portrayal of Lyndon Baines Johnson by Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston.
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Miracles in the Cornfield

Steve Logan writes of his slight acquaintance with Seamus Heaney and his influence on him as a university teacher.
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Take My Advice

Democracy and debate are all very well - in their place. But sometimes we should surely just listen to the advice of people who know more about these things than we do.
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The Boys in the Band

Some people thought the guys in the group, and particularly the drummer, had no rights at all and should play what, and wherever, and for as long as they were told. But Joseph Haydn rapped his bow and stood up to them.
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In Kafka's Deathhouse

Franz Kafka died in an Austrian sanatorium from an incurable illness, aged forty, in 1924. Nothing could be done for him. There were some far more questionable deaths just up the road from there almost twenty years later.
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It's No Go The Poetry Show

One of Ireland's greatest poets died fifty years ago today. So let's make a bit of space for that too.
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Letter from Gulladuff

South Derry farming folk, sending their children away to board in Derry city, were assured that at least they'd get a good dinner. They didn't.
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