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Space to Think, a new book celebrating ten years of the Dublin Review of Books More Information 

The Beautiful German Language

Some people think it sounds harsh, and some very eminent Germans historically thought it wouldn't do, but spoken by the right person it will make you swoon.
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Those who can teach

Remembering the wonderful English actor Richard Griffiths, who died last week aged sixty-five.
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European Anti-Semitism

American novelist and short story writer Cynthia Ozick claims to find an ineradicable anti-Semitism at work in Europe. But her definition of the phenomenon may not be the same as yours or mine.
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Gentleman At Arms

Evelyn Waugh writes to his friend Dorothy Lygon about his wartime adventures and work on what was to become Brideshead Revisited.
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Moscow Year Zero

A detailed study of Moscow in the year that Stalin's purges got into full swing is, writes one reviewer, an almost impossibly rich masterpiece.
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Dreamtime in Llareggub

A little bit of Under Milk Wood for St David's Day. Mrs Ogmore-Pritchard rehearses her two late husbands.
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Was the Famine a Genocide?

Two historians clash in a Belfast radio interview on the Famine. Did the British deliberately plan for genocide by 'allowing nature to run its course'?
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Light, and bright, and sparkling

Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice was published two hundred years ago today. Miss Austen couldn’t wait to try it out on the neighbours.
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The Language Police

George Orwell taught us how to detect cant and doublespeak. He also had some views on language that would do credit to a retired colonel in Tunbridge Wells.
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Lord of the Files

Seamus Heaney pays tribute to a man beloved by his friends for his originality as a poet, his acuity as a critic, his probity and courage and merriment.
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Casement's End

New material that sheds light on the last days of Roger Casement has been released by the National Library on open digital format.
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A Cold January

The English naturalist Gilbert White writes of the harsh January weather of 1776.
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More, please

Enough is as good as a feast. But a feast is as good as enough.
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THEIR INTELLECTUALS AND OURS

An American academic finds the people he meets abroad more interesting and more widely knowledgeable than his colleagues and peers at home.
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FOUR LEGS GOOD

George Orwell's sister found that while pigs might be wonderful symbols they were also not bad eating.
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THE BEATEN DOCKET

Ideas are not cost-free, argues Ronald Aronson. They have consequences, and we cannot shrug our shoulders about those and say 'nothing to do with me'.
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DRESSED TRIPE AND TIPSY FIGS

Having been exposed to French cooking and French life always puts you a notch up, writes American novelist James Salter. Which could explain a thing or two.
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WAUGH IN ABYSSINIA

Evelyn Waugh went to Abyssinia as a war reporter in 1935, where he mostly missed the war but thought the Italians were doing a good job of spreading civilisation in darkest Africa.
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PHILIP LARKIN IN WEST BELFAST

The young poet arrived in Ulster's capital in 1950 and soon got his first glimpse of the province's great tradition of sectarian politics.
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POLITICAL POETS

Beware of poets' mere opinions or opinionating, writes David Wheatley. Many construct whole personae to this end, while secretly defying the reader to see them awry, in an entirely different light.
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