I am so at home in Dublin, more than any other city, that I feel it has always been familiar to me. It took me years to see through its soft charm to its bitter prickly kernel - which I quite like too.

Ireland 1912 - 1922

A Terrible Beauty: Poetry of 1916

A collection of poems of revolution and dreams and visions of freedom and nationhood for Ireland - focusing on before, during and after the 1916 Rising.

Handbook of the Irish Revival

Features an array of texts from authors such as James Joyce, James Connolly and W.B. Yeats as well as insightful introductions and commentaries by Declan Kiberd and P.J. Mathews.

Rebel Sisters

Growing up in the privileged confines of Dublin’s leafy Rathmines, the bright, beautiful Gifford sisters Grace, Muriel and Nellie kick against the conventions of their wealthy Anglo-Irish background and their mother Isabella’s expectations. Soon, as war erupts across Europe, the spirited sisters find themselves caught up in their country’s struggle for freedom.

Signatories

The text of a unique theatre performance in which eight Irish writers remember the 1916 revolutionaries. A performance introduction on the staging of the play is given by Director Patrick Mason, and an introduction by Lucy Collins, School of English, Drama and Film, UCD, sets the historical context of the play.

Police Casualties in Ireland 1919-1922

What of the young ‘Tans’, the victorious and often decorated survivors of the Great War? Now they found themselves fighting a vicious, doomed campaign within their own country, yet in a foreign land where they could trust no one and were despised. Sharing a lonely, fierce comradeship, they felt these deaths with the sting of betrayal and with a rage that was driven against other men, other families, other victims.

Police Casualties in Ireland 1919-1922

What of the young ‘Tans’, the victorious and often decorated survivors of the Great War? Now they found themselves fighting a vicious, doomed campaign within their own country, yet in a foreign land where they could trust no one and were despised. Sharing a lonely, fierce comradeship, they felt these deaths with the sting of betrayal and with a rage that was driven against other men, other families, other victims.

Cathal Brugha

Cathal Brugha was a figure of central importance to the Irish Revolution and despite this, he is almost totally neglected in the history of this period. This is the first dedicated English-language biography to focus on this fascinating figure. Using new archival material from the Bureau of Military History, Fergus O'Farrell documents Brugha's career as a revolutionary. This closely-researched work examines Brugha's complex attitudes to violence as well as illuminating his commitment to political methods.

Ireland’s Call

An account of the Irish sporting heroes who died on the battlefields of the World War I, featuring the lives of Irish international sports stars from the world of football, rugby, cricket, GAA, athletics and hockey, whose lives ended in Somme, Ypres and Gallipoli.

Irish Days, Indian Memories

The little-known story of the fourth President of India and fellow Indian Law students attending UCD and King’s Inns during the dramatic years of 1913-1916. Diaries, letters and college records reveal unique insights into student life and the Indian students’ reaction to the political violence of the period.

Wherever the Firing Line Extends

From the first shot monument in Mons to the plaque to the Royal Irish Lancers who liberated the town on Armistice Day 1918, Ronan McGreevy looks at those places where the Irish made their mark and are remembered in the monuments, cemeteries and landscapes of France and Flanders.

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