I am so at home in Dublin, more than any other city, that I feel it has always been familiar to me. It took me years to see through its soft charm to its bitter prickly kernel - which I quite like too.

Blogs et cetera

BLOG

The Low Pay Trap

Marie Sherlock
Marie Sherlock writes: Looking from the outside in, Ireland is a paradox of plenty. Despite the havoc wreaked by the pandemic, our economy expanded...

BLOG

The Irish Psyche

Maurice Earls
  Maurice Earls writes: It was reported recently in the Financial Times that the British might cut off gas supplies to Ireland this winter. And...

BLOG

Isolation Anxiety

Maurice Earls
Maurice Earls writes: In response to the invasion of Ukraine and more particularly in response to the European reaction to that invasion, people in...

APPRECIATION

Cathal Coughlan 1960-2022

John Fleming
John Fleming writes: A sturdy melodic voice emanates from a man whose face and twisted body communicate some existential torture. Precise narrative lyrics work with...

Defending History

Maurice Earls
  Maurice Earls writes: A story entitled “Three Glimpses of Life”, written by Patrick Kavanagh in preparation for his landmark novel Tarry Flynn, is a...

APPRECIATION

David McKechnie 1976-2022

Enda O’Doherty writes: Back in the 1990s I went on a short “study trip” to Germany as part of a small group of journalists,...

BLOG

Living with Big Brother

Tom Hennigan
Tom Hennigan writes: After the swift unravelling of the Soviet Union, its strategic thinkers scrambled to justify Russia’s demand for continuing influence in lands...

blog

Down With Cows!

Maurice Earls
  Maurice Earls writes: Micheál Martin was in Washington for St Patrick’s Day and caught Covid, or perhaps he brought it with him. Either way...

BLOG

Not Dead Yet

Dave Duggan
  Dave Duggan writes: In 1990, Routledge published The Death of the Irish Language by Reg Hindley. I was writing radio drama in English and...

blog

The Mould Broken

  Enda O’Doherty writes: With the publication yesterday (March 7th) by France’s constitutional council of the list of approved candidates, the campaign for the presidential...

blog

The men that is now

  Maurice Earls writes: Everyone agrees that James Joyce, who was born 140 years ago today (February 2nd), was unusually observant. Somehow he captured what...

blog

Can we afford the price of greed?

Enda O’Doherty writes: When people choose to comment on the affairs of another country it can often be that, as they speak, they are...

Eulogy

Frank Callanan 1956-2021

  Frank Callanan died suddenly at his Dublin home on December 12th last year. Frank was a distinguished senior counsel and historian. The author of...

blog

How can you sell Killarney?

Enda O’Doherty writes: One of the more amusing moments in the neither long nor glorious history of far-right politics in Ireland came in the...

blog

Mahon in the Milky Way

Michael O’Loughlin writes: Back in the mid-1980s, after several years living in Amsterdam, I rashly decided that what that great city needed was a...

blog

The Execrable System

Maurice Earls writes: Gaelic culture and society collapsed in Ireland from the late seventeenth century on following several centuries of attack and military defeat....

blog

Man is a Giddy Thing

Enda O’Doherty writes: “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future,” the celebrated American baseball catcher Yogi Berra is reported to have said....

BLOG

When Johnny Goes Marching

When Johnny Goes Marching Maurice Earls writes: As some may recall, a few years ago genetic studies emerged which revealed that in excess of twenty...

Lecture

Unionisms and Partition

Richard Bourke
Richard Bourke Two years after the 1920 Government of Ireland Act which first established Northern Ireland as a distinct jurisdiction within the United Kingdom, Ronald...

Aren’t we great?

John Fanning
John Fanning The Irish, Terry Eagleton wrote, were put on earth for other people to feel romantic about. If the positive image we have long...

What’ll I read?

If we were to pledge not to buy another book until we’d read every last one we have on our shelves at home, booksellers and publishers would soon go out of business. They should not worry, however, for our desire to buy and to collect seems to be unquenchable. As Italo Calvino observed, behind the doors of the bookshop a formidable array of volumes is always waiting to ambush you.

Taking a Tumble

Guy Beiner
Those who partake in ‘decommemorating’, in the form of pulling down statues or otherwise, frequently see themselves as agents of oblivion, determined to efface an undesirable memory. But in the very act of calling attention to an offensive monument, they are in effect agents of memory, unwittingly reviving remembrance of the memorial they seek to supplant.

Down on the Street

This article is adapted from the introduction to Reclaiming the European Street: Speeches on Europe and the European Union, 2016-2020, by Michael D Higgins,...

A Quare One

And when he was come into his own country, he taught them in their synagogue, insomuch that they were astonished, and said, Whence hath...

RESPONSE

Big Questions in Irish History

Liam Kennedy
Reading an issue of the drb is like splashing happily in a pool of ideas. Maurice Earls’s dash across several centuries of Irish history,...

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